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How long are the terms of US senators and representatives?

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❶The Constitution establishes the qualifications for members of the House of Representatives and Senate. Majority Vote A vote of more than half of the legislative body considering a measure.

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The method, used by members of the public, by which a measure adopted by the Legislature may be submitted to the electorate for a vote. A referendum petition must be signed by electors equal in number to 5 percent of the votes for all candidates for Governor at the last gubernatorial election. Recording the vote of each member of a committee or of the full Assembly or Senate. Committee roll calls are conducted by the committee secretary, who calls each member's name in alphabetical order with the name of the chair called last.

Assembly roll calls are conducted electronically, with each Member pushing a button from his or her assigned seat. Senate roll calls are conducted by the Reading Clerk, who reads each Senator's name in alphabetical order. Principles formally adopted to govern the operation of either or both houses. Second reading occurs after a bill has been reported to the floor from committee.

The portion of the Daily File that lists measures that have been reported out of committee. Measures stay on the second reading file for one legislative day before moving to the third reading portion of the File.

A Senate employee serving as principal parliamentarian and record keeper for the Senate, elected by Senators at the beginning of each two-year session. The Senate Secretary and his or her staff are responsible for publishing the Senate daily and weekly publications. Ordinarily, a portion of the California Codes or other statutory law; alternatively, a portion of the text of a bill.

The text of code sections is set forth in bills as proposed to be amended, repealed, or added. The house of the California Legislature consisting of 40 members elected from districts apportioned on the basis of population, one-half of whom are elected or re-elected every two years for four-year terms.

Employee responsible for maintaining order and providing security for the Legislature. The Chief Sergeant-at-Arms in each house is elected by the Members of that house at the beginning of every legislative session. The period during which the Legislature meets.

The Legislature may meet in either regular or special extraordinary session. The presiding officer of the Assembly, elected by the membership of the Assembly at the beginning of the two-year session. This is the highest-ranking Member of the Assembly. Member, appointed to this office by the Speaker, who presides over a floor session of the Assembly at the request of the Speaker.

Occasionally a bill is of such importance that advance notice is given as to when it will be considered by the Assembly or Senate. Notice is given during a floor session by requesting unanimous consent to set the bill as a special order of business on a specific date and time.

This assures adequate time for debate and allows all Members the opportunity to be present. The Member of the Legislature, private individual, or group who develops a measure and advocates its passage.

A bill that proposes nonsubstantive amendments to a code section in a particular subject; introduced to assure that a bill will be available, subsequent to the deadline to introduce bills, for revision by amendments that are germane to the subject of the bill. Head of the Bureau of State Audits, which conducts financial and performance audits of the state and local government agencies at the request of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

State legislative enactment or administrative regulation that mandates a new program or higher level of service on the part of a local government, the costs of which are required by the California Constitution to be reimbursed. Enacted bills, which are chaptered by the Secretary of State in the order in which they become law. A subgroup of a full committee, appointed to perform work on one or more functions of the committee. Digests of each bill enacted in a two-year session, as prepared and compiled by the Legislative Counsel.

The measures are listed by chapter number, reflecting the order in which they were signed into law. A motion to waive requirements that the California Constitution imposes, but permits to be waived in a specified manner. A motion to suspend requires an extraordinary vote.

Any bill that imposes, repeals, or materially alters a state tax. The Legislative Counsel indicates in the title and Digest of the bill whether the bill is a tax levy. Third reading occurs when the measure is about to be taken up on the floor of either house for final passage.

A summary of a measure that is ready for floor consideration. Describes most recent amendments and contains information regarding how Members voted on the measure when it was heard in committee. Senate floor analyses also list support or opposition by interest groups and government agencies.

That portion of the Daily File listing the bills that are ready to be taken up for final passage. The material on the first page of a bill that identifies the provisions of law affected by the bill and the subject matter of the bill.

In the Assembly, 54; in the Senate, Required, for example, for urgency measures and most measures making appropriations from the General Fund. The consent of all of those Members present, ordinarily presumed to exist in the absence of objection.

That portion of the Daily File that contains measures awaiting Senate or Assembly concurrence in amendments adopted by the other house. Also contains measures vetoed by the Governor for a day period after the veto or Governor's Appointments for confirmation. Section of a bill stating that the bill will take effect immediately upon enactment. A vote on the urgency clause, requiring a two-thirds vote in each house, must precede a vote on the bill.

A bill affecting the public peace, health, or safety, containing an urgency clause, and requiring a two-thirds vote for passage. An urgency bill becomes effective immediately upon enactment. The Governor's formal rejection of a measure passed by the Legislature. The Governor may also exercise a line item veto, whereby the amount of an appropriation is reduced or eliminated, while the rest of the bill is approved see Blue Pencil. A veto may be overridden by a two-thirds vote in each house.

A vote that requires only an oral "aye" or "no," with no official count taken. The presiding officer determines whether the "ayes" or "noes" carry. Skip to main content. Act A bill passed by the Legislature and enacted into law.

Adjournment Termination of a meeting, occurring at the close of each legislative day upon the completion of business, with the hour and day of the next meeting being set prior to adjournment. Adjournment Sine Die Final adjournment of the Legislature; regular sessions of the Legislature, and any special session not previously adjourned, are adjourned sine die at midnight on November 30 of each even-numbered year.

Adoption Approval or acceptance; usually applied to amendments, resolutions, or motions. Amendment Proposal to change the text of a bill after it has been introduced.

Author amendments - Amendments proposed by the bill's author. Author's amendments to a bill may be adopted on the floor prior to the committee hearing on the bill with the committee chair's approval. Hostile amendments - Amendments proposed by another member and opposed by the author in a committee hearing or during Assembly or Senate Floor consideration.

Analysis of the Budget Bill The Legislative Analyst's comprehensive examination of the Governor's budget, available to legislators and the public about six weeks after the Governor submits the budget to the Legislature.

Appropriation The amount of money made available for expenditure by a specific entity for a specific purpose, from the General Fund or other designated state fund or account.

Appropriations Limit A limitation in the California Constitution on the maximum amount of tax proceeds that state or local government may appropriate in a fiscal year. Approved by the Governor Signature of the Governor on a bill passed by the Legislature. Archives Refers to both location and contents of public records kept by the Secretary of State, including copies of all measures considered at each session, journals, committee reports, and documents of historic value.

Assembly The house of the California Legislature consisting of 80 members, elected from districts determined on the basis of population. Author Member of the Legislature who introduces a legislative measure.

BCP Budget Change Proposal A document prepared by a state agency, and submitted to the Department of Finance, to propose and document budget changes to support operations of the agency in the next fiscal year; used in preparing the Governor's budget.

Bicameral Refers to a legislature consisting of two houses see Unicameral. Bill A proposed law, introduced during a session for consideration by the Legislature, and identified numerically in order of presentation; also, a reference that may include joint and concurrent resolutions and constitutional amendments.

Blue Pencil The California Constitution grants the Governor "line item veto" authority to reduce or eliminate any item of appropriation in any bill including the Budget Bill. Bond Bill general obligation bonds A bill authorizing the sale of state general obligation bonds to finance specified projects or activities. Budget Proposed expenditure of state moneys for the next fiscal year, presented by the Governor in January of each year for consideration by the Legislature; compiled by the Department of Finance, in conjunction with state agency and department heads.

Budget Act The Budget Bill after it has been enacted into law. Budget Bill The bill setting forth the spending proposal for the next fiscal year, containing the budget submitted to the Legislature by the Governor.

Budget Year The fiscal year addressed by a proposed budget, beginning July 1 and ending June Call of the House On motion from the floor to place a call of the house, the presiding officer directs the Sergeant-at-Arms to lock the chambers and bring in the absent Members by arrest, if necessary to vote on a measure under consideration. Call the Absentees Order by the presiding officer directing the reading clerk to call the names of Members who have not responded to the roll call.

Capital Outlay Generally, expenditures to acquire or construct real property. Capitol Press Corps Those members of the press who cover events in the Capitol. Casting Vote The deciding vote the Lieutenant Governor may cast in the case of a tie vote in the Senate. Caucus 1 A closed meeting of legislators of one's own party.

Chair The current presiding officer, usually in the context of a committee hearing. Chamber The Assembly or Senate location where floor sessions are held. Chapter When a bill has been passed by the Legislature and enacted into law, the Secretary of State assigns the bill a "chapter number" such as "Chapter , Statutes of ," which is subsequently used to refer to the measure in place of the bill number.

Chapter Out When, during a calendar year, two or more bills amend the same section of law and more than one of those bills becomes law, the bill enacted last and therefore given a higher chapter number becomes law and prevails over the bill or bills previously enacted see Double Joint. Check-in Session Certain weekdays when legislators do not meet in formal legislative sessions, they are required to "check in" with the Chief Clerk of the Assembly or Secretary of the Senate.

Chief Clerk An Assembly employee elected by Assembly Members at the beginning of every two-year session to serve as principal parliamentarian and record keeper of the Assembly. Coauthor A member of either house whose name is added to a bill as a coauthor by amending the bill, usually indicating support for the proposal.

Codes Bound volumes of law organized by subject matter. Committee of the Whole The Assembly or Senate meeting as a committee for the purpose of receiving information. Companion Bill An identical bill introduced in the other house.

Concurrence The approval by the house of origin of a bill as amended in the other house. Concurrent Resolution A measure introduced in one house that, if approved, must be sent to the other house for approval. Conferees Members of a conference committee. Conference Committee Usually composed of three legislators two voting in the majority on the disputed issue, one voting in the minority from each house, a conference committee meets in public session to forge one version of a bill when the house of origin has refused to concur in amendments to the bill adopted by the other house.

Confirm The process whereby one or both houses approve the Governor's appointments to executive offices, departments, boards, and commissions.

Consent Calendar File containing bills that received no dissenting votes in committee. Constituent A person who resides within the district represented by a legislator. Constitutional Amendment A resolution proposing a change to the California Constitution. Consultant Ordinarily, a professional staff person who works for a legislative committee.

Contingent Effect Section in a bill indicating that it is to become operative only upon the enactment of another measure to be distinguished from double jointing. Convene To assemble a meeting. Each house of the Legislature usually convenes twice a week. Daily File Publication produced by each house for each day the house is in session.

Daily History Produced by the Assembly and Senate respectively the day after each house has met. Daily Journal Produced by the Assembly and Senate respectively the day after a floor session. Desk The long desk in front of the presiding officer's rostrum where much of the clerical work of the body is conducted. Desk Is Clear Statement by the presiding officer that there is no further business before the house.

Digest Prepared by the Legislative Counsel, it summarizes the effect of a proposed bill on current law. District The area of the state represented by a legislator. District Bill A bill that generally affects only the district of the Member of the Legislature who introduced the bill. Do Pass Motion that, if adopted by a committee, moves a bill to the floor or to the next committee.

Double Joint Amendments to a bill providing that the amended bill does not override the provisions of another bill, where both bills propose to amend the same section of law see Chapter Out. Double Refer Legislation recommended for referral to two policy committees for hearing rather than one. Dropped Author has decided not to pursue the passage of the bill.

Enacting Clause The following phrase at the beginning of the text of each bill: Enrollment Whenever a bill passes both houses of the Legislature, it is ordered enrolled. Executive Session A committee meeting restricted to committee members and specifically invited persons. Expunge A motion by which an action taken in a floor session is deleted from the Daily Journal for example, "Expunge the record".

Extraordinary Session A special legislative session called by the Governor by proclamation to address only those issues specified in the proclamation; also referred to as a special session. File See Daily File. Final History The publication printed at the end of every session showing the final disposition of all measures.

Finance Letter Revisions to the Budget Bill proposed by the Department of Finance and addressed to appropriate committee chairs in the Assembly and Senate. First Reading Each bill introduced must be read three times before final passage. Fiscal Bill Generally, a measure that contains an appropriation of funds or requires a state agency to incur additional expense.

Fiscal Deadline The date on the legislative calendar by which all bills with fiscal effect must have been taken up in a policy committee and referred to a fiscal committee. Fiscal Year The month period on which the state budget is planned, beginning July 1 and ending June 30 of the following year. Floor 1 The Assembly or Senate Chamber. Matters may be said to be "on the floor. Floor Pass A visitor may not observe the Assembly or Senate from the rear of the chamber without a floor pass.

Germaneness Referring to the legislative rule requirement that an amendment to a bill be relevant to the subject matter of the bill as introduced. Governor's Budget The spending plan submitted by the Governor in January for the next fiscal year see Budget. Grandfathering When a preexisting situation is exempted from the requirements of a new law. Hearing A committee meeting convened for the purpose of gathering information on a subject or considering specific legislative measures.

Held in Committee Status of a bill that fails to receive sufficient affirmative votes to pass out of committee. Hijack Adoption of amendments that delete the contents of a bill and insert provisions on a different subject see Germaneness. House In California, refers to either the Senate or the Assembly. Inactive File The portion of the Daily File containing legislation that is ready for floor consideration, but, for a variety of reasons, is dormant. Initiative A legislative proposal to change statutory law or the California Constitution, submitted directly by members of the public rather than by the Legislature, and requiring voter approval at a statewide election.

Interim The period of time between the end of a legislative year and the beginning of the next legislative year. Interim Study The assignment of the subject matter of a bill to the appropriate committee for study during the period the Legislature is not in session. Joint Resolution A resolution expressing the Legislature's opinion about a matter within the jurisdiction of the federal government, which is forwarded to Congress for its information. Journal See Daily Journal. Laws The rules adopted by formal governmental action that govern our lives in various respects.

Lay On The Table A motion to temporarily postpone consideration of a matter before a committee or the house, such that the matter may later be brought up for consideration by a motion to "take from the table. Legislative Analyst The Legislative Analyst, who is a legislative appointee, and his or her staff provide thorough, nonpartisan analysis of the budget submitted by the Governor; also analyze the fiscal impact of other legislation and prepare analyses of ballot measures published in the state ballot pamphlet.

Legislative Counsel The Legislative Counsel who is appointed jointly by both houses and his or her legal staff are responsible for, among other things, drafting all bills and amendments, preparing the Digest for each bill, providing legal opinions, and representing the Legislature in legal proceedings.

Legislative Counsel's Digest See Digest. Legislative Data Center Department of the Office of Legislative Counsel that maintains the Legislative Information System, operates the database under which legislation is drafted and conveyed to the Office of State Publishing to be printed, and otherwise provides technological support to the Legislature. Legislative Information System LIS A database containing bill analyses, bill status, bill text, votes, and other useful information for bill tracking and research by legislative employees in Sacramento and district offices.

Lobbyist See Legislative Advocate. Majority Floor Leader Assembly Member or Senator who is an issues and political strategist for their respective majority party, second in command to the Assembly Speaker or Senate President Pro Tempore. Majority Vote A vote of more than half of the legislative body considering a measure.

Majority Whip One of the members of the majority party's leadership team in the Assembly or Senate; responsible for monitoring legislation and securing votes for legislation on the floor.

Mason's Manual The reference manual that governs matters of parliamentary procedure that are not covered by the Legislature's own written rules. May Revision Occurring in early May, the updated estimate of revenues and expenditures that replaces the estimates contained in the Governor's budget submitted in January. Measure A bill, resolution, or constitutional amendment that is considered by the Legislature.

Minority Floor Leader The highest-ranking minority party post in each house; chief policy and political strategist for the minority party. Minority Whip One of the members of the minority party's leadership team in the Assembly or Senate; responsible for monitoring legislation and securing votes for legislation on the floor. Minutes An accurate record of the proceedings see Daily Journal.

Motion A formal proposal for action made by a legislator during a committee hearing or floor session. Nonfiscal Bill A measure not having specified financial impact on the state and, therefore, not required to be heard in an Assembly or Senate fiscal committee as it moves through the legislative process.

Officers Those Members and employees of the Legislature who are elected by the membership of each house at the beginning of each session to perform specific functions on behalf of the house. On Call A roll call vote in a committee or an Assembly or Senate floor session that has occurred but has not yet been concluded or formally announced. Out of Order A parliamentary ruling by the presiding officer of a committee or the house that a matter is not, at that time, appropriate for consideration by the body.

Override Enactment of a bill despite the Governor's veto, by a vote of two thirds of the members of each house 27 votes in the Senate and 54 votes in the Assembly. Parliamentary Inquiry A procedural question posed by a legislator during a committee hearing or floor session.

Pass on File A bill is taken up during a floor session by its author or floor manager according to its order in the Assembly or Senate Daily File.

Passage Adoption of a measure by the Assembly or the Senate. Petition A formal request submitted to the Legislature by an individual or group of individuals. Point of Order A request that the presiding officer remedy a breach of order or of the rules. Point of Personal Privilege Assertion by a Member that his or her rights, reputation, or conduct have been impugned, entitling the Member to repudiate the allegations. Postpone A motion to delay action on a matter before the house.

Presiding Managing the proceedings during a floor session. Press Conference A presentation of information to a group of reporters. Previous Question If a Member seeks to cut off all further debate on a measure, he or she may call the previous question to seek to compel the body to vote immediately on the issue. Principal Coauthor A Member who is so designated on a bill or other measure, indicating that the Member is a primary supporter of the measure.

Privilege of the Floor Permission given, by the presiding officer, to view the proceedings from the floor of the Chamber, rather than from the gallery. Put Over A motion to delay action on a measure until a future date. Quorum A simple majority of the membership of a committee or the Assembly or Senate; the minimum number of legislators needed to begin conducting official business. Quorum Call Transmitting the message that members are needed to establish a quorum so that proceedings may begin.

Reading Presentation of a bill before the house by reading its number, author, and title. Reapportionment Revising the allocation of congressional seats based on census results. Recess 1 An official pause in a committee hearing or floor session that halts the proceedings for a period of time but does not have the finality of adjournment. Referendum The method, used by members of the public, by which a measure adopted by the Legislature may be submitted to the electorate for a vote.

Rescind A motion to revoke an action previously taken. Roll Call Recording the vote of each member of a committee or of the full Assembly or Senate. Rules Principles formally adopted to govern the operation of either or both houses. Second Reading Each bill introduced must be read three times before final passage.

Second Reading File The portion of the Daily File that lists measures that have been reported out of committee. Secretary of the Senate A Senate employee serving as principal parliamentarian and record keeper for the Senate, elected by Senators at the beginning of each two-year session.

Section Ordinarily, a portion of the California Codes or other statutory law; alternatively, a portion of the text of a bill. Senate The house of the California Legislature consisting of 40 members elected from districts apportioned on the basis of population, one-half of whom are elected or re-elected every two years for four-year terms.

Sergeant-At-Arms Employee responsible for maintaining order and providing security for the Legislature. Session The period during which the Legislature meets. Short Committee A hearing of a committee attended by less than a quorum of the members of the committee. Speaker The presiding officer of the Assembly, elected by the membership of the Assembly at the beginning of the two-year session. Speaker Pro Tempore Member, appointed to this office by the Speaker, who presides over a floor session of the Assembly at the request of the Speaker.

Special Order of Business Occasionally a bill is of such importance that advance notice is given as to when it will be considered by the Assembly or Senate.

Sponsor The Member of the Legislature, private individual, or group who develops a measure and advocates its passage. There are no term limits in Illinois. Term length for a senator vs a representative? A senator's term is 6 years, a representative only 2 years. More information can be found here: The difference between a senator and a representative: What is the term for an elected senator in the US senate?

United States Senators serve terms of six years. The term of a Senator is six years. What are the terms of US Senators and Representatives respectively? Senators serve a six-year term in their elected offices,Representative serve two-year terms in Congress. Due to thestaggering of terms for Senators, approximately one-third ofSenators are elected every two years. What sets the term lengths of US Senators and Congressmen? How many years is the term of a us senator?

A US Senator is elected to a 6 year term. He may serve more than one term. What is the length of a US Representatives term on office? The length of a term is two years, although he can always re - elected after every two years. How many terms do US senators have?

Senators are notlimited in the number of terms they can serve. How long is a term for senate and how many terms can be used? One term is six years. They can be re-elected as often as they can win. What is the length of the term of office for members of the US Senate? What are the Lengths of a term for a senator? Which states limit the number of terms for US Senators? It is unconstitutional for states to impose term limits on US Senators and Congressmen.

Thornton, the US Supreme Court held the states couldn't impose term limits on Senators and Congressmen because their qualifications are outlined in the US Constitution. Further, the Seventeenth Amendment provided for election of US Senators by popular vote, superseding Article I, Section 3, Clauses 1 and 2, that allowed election of Senators by state legislatures, and transferring this power to the people. US Term Limits Inc. What is the length of term for members of the US Senate xy? The Constitution establishes the qualifications for members of the House of Representatives and Senate.

A Representative must be 25 years of age. S Senator must be at least 30 years old. Members of the House of Representatives are elected every two years. There is no limit on the number of terms a Senator or Representative may serve. Once elected, a Senator or Representative continues to serve until the expiration of his term, death, or resignation.

The Constitution also permits the House to expell any member with a two-thirds vote. How can you get term limits on US Senators and Congressmen? Voters can set practical term limits on a US Senator or Congressman by voting him or her out of office in the general election. There is no way to pass a law or state constitutional amendment that imposes legal limits on their terms, however, because the US Supreme Court found that unconstitutional in US Term Limits Inc.

For more information, see Related Questions, below. What is purpose for the length of a Senator term of office? I think there are two main reasons for having fixed terms for Senators. The first is to ensure that the people get to decide who represents them from time to time.

If a Senator were there for life, you wouldn't be able to get rid of a bad one. The second reason is because the chances of becoming corrupt are greater if you can't be removed from office. Senators in the Texas legislature draw lots to determine the length of their terms every? After the census, senate districts are reapportioned, and all senators run for election in the newly apportioned districts.

When the legislature convenes, senators draw lots to determine if they will serve a two- or four-year term. Normally, one half of the senate will serve for two years, then fours years and four again.

The other half of the senate will serve for four years, four years again, and then two years until the next census and reapportionment. If senate districts are reapportioned between censuses due to court challenges or some other reason, all senators again run for election and then draw lots to determine if they will come up for reelection again in two or four years.

For what length of term is a senator elected? US Senators are elected to a 6-year term, and if continuously elected, can hold that office until death. Why are US Senate term limits unconstitutional? What are the terms for the president the house and the senate of the US? The term for a US President is 4 years, with a 2 term limit.

The term for a US Senator is 6 years, with no term limits, and the term for a US Representative is 2 years, also, with no term limits. When a US Senator is centured. Tell me the meaning of the term.? How many years is a representatives term and senators term and why the terms lengths differ? When will the terms of alabama's US senators end?

Richard Shelby R-AL senior senator was elected for the term Jeff Sessions R-AL junior senator was elected for the term When will the US senator terms end in New Hampshire? Senator Shaheen comes up for reelection in , and Senator Ayotte comes up for reelection in How long is the terms served by the us senators? Why aren't there term limits for us senators? To put the answer simply - the Constitution allows for it.

The only reason the President has a term limit is so that we would not be considered a dictatorship - imagine the same President running for office after every term! There was a case asking for terms for senators in Arkansas in , it passed.

However, in , the case was nullified for being unconstitutional. US Term Limits v. What is the Term length for Florida senators? The Florida Senate has 40 members. They serve four-year terms and have a term limit that prevents themfrom running for re-election if they have served in office for thepast eight consecutive years.

How many us senator term in years?

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The Senate is composed of senators, each of whom represents a single state in its entirety, with each state being equally represented by two senators, regardless of its population, serving staggered terms of six years; with 50 states currently in the Union, there are U.S. Senators.

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A system with senators who serve one two-year term and two four-year terms every ten years is considered a term system. In the 12 states where the length of the term is two years, all state senate seats are up for re-election every two years.

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US senators are elected to terms of 6 years. The Senate is divided into three groups, such that about one-third of the office holders are up for election every two years. Senators in Class III were elected to office in the November general election, unless they took their seat through appointment or special election. Their terms run from the beginning of the th Congress on January 3, to the end of the th Congress on January 3,

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Also, a generic term for the staff and offices of the Secretary of the Senate and the Chief Clerk of the Assembly. Desk Is Clear Statement by the presiding officer that there is . The Senate will convene on November 20, , for the Organization Session.